“Vaccines Work: We Are Protected Together”

Celebrated in the last week of April, World Immunization Week aims to promote the use of vaccines to protect people of all ages against disease. Immunization saves millions of lives every year and is widely recognized as one of the world’s most successful and cost-effective health interventions. Yet, there are still nearly 20 million unvaccinated and under-vaccinated children in the world today.

World Immunization Week is a global public health campaign to raise awareness and increase rates of immunization against vaccine-preventable diseases around the world. It takes place each year during last week of April

World Immunization Week is a global public health campaign to raise awareness and increase rates of immunization against vaccine-preventable diseases around the world. It takes place each year during last week of April.

World Immunization Week is a global public health campaign to raise awareness and increase rates of immunization against vaccine-preventable diseases around the world. It takes place each year during last week of April.

It is unfortunate that even in the 21st century we need to reaffirm people’s belief in vaccinations and immunisations! The World Health Organisation identified Vaccine Hesitancy as one of its ten global threats for 2019. It is “the reluctance or refusal to vaccinate despite the availability of vaccines”. In the past year, the “Anti-Vaxxing” movement has taken a huge leap- and this is not something we should be proud of; it threatens to reverse progress made in tackling vaccine-preventable diseases. 

Vaccination is one of the most cost-effective ways of avoiding disease – it currently prevents 2-3 million deaths a year, and a further 1.5 million could be avoided if global coverage of vaccinations improved. 

Measles, for example, has seen a 30% increase in cases globally. The reasons for this rise are complex, and not all of these cases are due to vaccine hesitancy. However, some countries that were close to eliminating the disease have seen a resurgence. 

The reasons why people choose not to vaccinate are complex; an advisory group to WHO identified complacency, inconvenience in accessing vaccines, and lack of confidence as key reasons underlying hesitancy

Vaccines and immunisation methods are both results of extensive ongoing scientific and medical research; it is truly unfortunate that people with access to these resources are denying its use, while an approximate of 27 million children are not immunised due to the lack of accessibility! 

In your opinion, what SDGs are correlated with the World Immunisation Week?

What can be done globally and locally to close the immunisation gap?

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